DNR Seeks Hunters Who Shot Caretaker

Authorities are asking for the public’s help to identify the people who maliciously shot the caretaker of a Union County property.

According to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, the incident occurred in the early morning hours of Friday, January 6th, when the caretaker found four hunters illegally hunting on private property. An argument ensued, which led to the caretaker receiving a single non-life threatening gunshot wound.

Other details are scarce due to DNR officers withholding key information – such as the exact location of the property, its owner, and the caretaker’s identity – in order to preserve the integrity of the investigation.

Anyone with information concerning this case or the possible identities of the hunters should call Conservation Officer Central Dispatch @ 812-837-9536, or leave an anonymous tip at 800-TIP-IDNR (800-847-4367).

The Delphi Murders: A Copy of the Ronald Logan Search Warrant

Ronald Logan, pictured here during an interview with Inside Edition.

True crime fans were shocked yesterday when new details were revealed in the Delphi Murder case. The documents, obtained via a FOIA request by the Murder Street podcast, sadly confirmed some of the most lurid rumors surrounding the deaths of Libby German (14) and Abby Williams (13).

In a request for a warrant to search the property of Ronald Logan, an FBI agent noted that – although there had been no signs of a struggle -the girls lost a great deal of blood when they died. Their bodies were then “moved and staged” and pieces of their clothing taken. Investigators believe the killer may have taken other souveniers as well, such as photos or videos.

Ronald Logan’s house was less than 1500 feet from where the girls were found. Authorities received fifteen separate tips indicating he was responsible for the murders. His cousin stated in an interview that Logan had asked for help establishing a false alibi for the time of the murders, and GPS data indicated he was near the crime scene. A woman who had once been in a relationship with him said he was physically violent and “always” carried a gun in a fanny pack. A previous search of his property, executed in connection with a parole violation, noted he possessed multiple handguns and knives.

Ronald Logan died in 2020. He was never formally named a suspect in the case.


This Day in Infamy: The Murder of Terry Lee Chasteen and Her Children

Young mother of three, Terry Lee Chasteen

April 28, 1978 – Divorced mother Terry Lee Chasteen was taking her three small children – Misty (5), Stephen (4), and Mark (2) – to the babysitter when another driver motioned for her to pull over. Terry pulled to the side of I-465, and the man pulled in behind her, explaining something was wrong with one of her rear tires. He offered to look at it for her, and the young mother gratefully accepted.

Tragically for Terry and her children, their supposed Good Samaritan was actually a conniving, violent criminal named Steven Timothy Judy. Once he had access to Terry’s car, Judy disabled it under the guise of fixing the nonexistant problem with her tire. Then, when she was unable to drive away, he convinced her to accept a ride.

Within an hour, Terry and all three children were dead.

After initially proclaiming his innocence, Judy later confessed to raping Terry before strangling her to death in full view of her children. Then the remorseless killer threw each of the kids, one by one, as far as he could into the cold water of White Lick Creek and watched as they drowned.

Steven Timothy Judy was executed in Indiana’s electric chair on March 9, 1981.

Update: Police Say Body of Dead Child was Found in Suitcase

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Indiana State Police have released more information regarding the body of the dead child found in Washington County last Saturday.

According to authorities, the little boy was found stuffed inside a hard suitcase with “a distinctive Las Vegas design on its front and back” in a wooded area at the 7000 block of East Holder Road. Although an autopsy was performed, no cause of death was determined. However, toxicology results are still pending.

The autopsy indicated the child is approximately 5 years old. He is described as a black male, approximately four feet tall, with a slender build and short haircut.

Investigators are still working to determine his identity. Although they have already received more than 200 calls regarding the case, he remains unknown.

“Right now that is the number one point of this investigation, to find out who this child is,” Sgt. Carey Huls said during a press conference on Monday. “At this point, we still do not have that information… and he deserves to be heard.”

Anyone with information about this case is urged to call the toll-free Indiana State Police hotline at 1-888-437-6432.

ISP Need Help Identifying a Dead Child

A mushroom hunter stumbled across the dead body of a child yesterday, and the Indiana State Police is requesting the public’s help to identify him.

He is described as an African-American child between the ages of 5 and 8-years-old. The little boy has a thin build, a short haircut, and stood about four feet tall.

Found near a roadside in a wooded area just east of Washington County, police believe he died sometime within the last week. His cause of death is currently unknown. An autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday.

If you have information concerning this child, please contact Detective Matt Busick of the Indiana State Police in Sellersburg (1-812-248-4374 or 1-800-872-6743).

Breaking News: Chuck E. Cheese – A Traumatizing Place to Be a Kid

Only the second-most terrifying thing at Chuck E. Cheese’s this week

At least, that was the case for patrons when a murder occurred at a Chuck E. Cheese on Indianapolis’s far eastside early Sunday evening.

Shots were reportedly fired from outside into the children’s-birthday-themed restaurant around 5:30 p.m, shattering an exterior window and creating chaos as children screamed and parents attempted to rush them to safety. One witness, Jessie Humphries, said she tried to escape out a back door only to find it locked.

“After that, nobody knew where to run, didn’t know who in the building was shooting,” said another woman who was there celebrating the birthday of her twin granddaughters.

Thankfully, only one casualty occurred. A man tentatively identified as Anthony Tinnin was found dead in the parking lot. Police believe he had been inside the Chuck E. Cheese then walked outside shortly before the shooting started. It’s unknown at this time if he was intentionally targeted.

Many of the children present were further tramatized when they saw the victim’s body as they exited the scene.

The perpetrators fled in a white SUV and remain at-large.

Anyone with information about this case is encouraged to contact IMPD Detective Lottie Patrick at 317-327-3475 or lottie.patrick@indy.gov. You can also anonymously leave information with the Crime Stoppers of Central Indiana by calling 317-262-TIPS (8477).

In Their Own Words: The Delphi Murders, Mike Patty

The grandparents who raised Libby German for most of her life,
Becky and Mike Patty

“I imagine there was an opportunity for one or both to separate and try to make a break different ways. Those girls loved each other. They were good friends. Neither one of them left each other’s sides. Both those girls are heroes in my book.”
– Mike Patty

Deep Dive: The Delphi Murders, Part 3

For many people who find themselves in a waking nightmare, there is a dividing line of before and after. Before the traumatic event, their lives follow a steady rhythm and familiar order. They’re reliable, if a bit predictable, and things make a certain kind of sense. After, their world is irreparably damaged, and nothing ever quite makes sense again.

In the world Libby German’s family lived in prior to the 13th of February, 2017, it was inconceivable to think something truly terrible had happened, even after they’d initially realized the girls were missing. The kidnapping of two middle school children in broad daylight just didn’t seem like something that could happen in Delphi. So, although they’d been looking for Libby and Abby for roughly two hours before notifying police, the overall mood was one of concern but not yet desperation. They kept telling themselves that one – or even both – of the girls must have fallen on the trail, and the pair were sticking it out together, waiting for someone to find them. Maybe they were lost. Maybe Libby’s phone was somehow been damaged. Maybe the girls didn’t even realize anyone was looking for them…anything but the awful truth.

The exception was Becky Patty, Libby’s grandmother. She’d raised Libby since the age of three, and she couldn’t shake the feeling that something was deeply wrong. She tried calling AT&T, Libby’s cell service provider, to see if they could locate her phone, but Libby had performed a factory reset on the phone the previous week, and none of the tracking apps had been turned back on since then. Frustrated, Becky hung up without receiving any real help from AT&T. At a loss, the family continued their search.

“Me and my uncle actually crossed the bridge when we were yelling for them down there, and I remember getting to the end of the bridge and looking to the left and seeing, like, someone had fallen down the hill over there,” Kelsi later remarked, referring to some depressions in the grass. “And I didn’t think anything of it.” She continued trying Libby’s phone. At one point, she believed her call connected but the moment of hope was quickly crushed when the line fell silent and couldn’t be reached again. It was then that Libby’s grandparents decided to call police. Assured things would soon be in more capable hands, Kelsi left the trails to report for work, already more than an hour late.

Meanwhile, Abby’s mother Anna Williams was also working. At the restaurant where she waitressed, she found a minute to check her phone before the dinner rush. Unbeknownst to Anna, Becky had been trying to call her to inform her of the situation. After all, if someone was going to be forced to tell the woman that her only child was missing, Becky didn’t want it to be police. Unable to reach Anna by telephone, she’d driven to the Williams home, only to be informed Anna was at work.

By that time, Mike had already called 911 and returned to combing the trails when he literally ran into a pair of responding officers, one each from the Delphi PD and one from the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department. After another brief search and discussion, the grandfather was asked to come file a formal missing persons report. Agreeing, he then called Becky to tell her to meet him at the sheriff’s office. Most of the other extended family members stayed behind to continue canvassing the woods, and people began asking for help on social media.

Shortly after she received the call from her husband Mike, Becky was finally able to speak with Anna. Abby’s mother readily agreed to leave work to meet the Pattys at the station but, like so many others, misinterpreted the severity of the circumstances. As she headed out the door, Anna optimistically told coworkers she’d sort everything out then probably be back in time to finish her shift.

Kelsi, too, was summoned away from work as authorities began questioning the families. Asked about her little sister’s social media, she showed the police two photos Libby had posted to Snapchat. The first was an artsy shot of High Bridge stretching out into the distance, away from the camera. The second photo was one of Abby crossing the bridge. Posted at approximately 2:07, the pictures were proof the girls had still been alive and well roughly half an hour after they’d been dropped off.

Photos taken by Liberty German, 14, moments before her death.
Her best friend, Abigail Williams, (photo to the right) died at her side.

Curious about Abby and Libby’s other social media activity, the authorities had members of both families gather the girls’ digital devices from their homes and bring them in for examination. Abby owned a tablet, but she had been forbidden from getting a cell phone until she was 14. She’d also been forbidden from joining Facebook, but it was quickly discovered that not only had she set up a profile, furthermore she had a male Facebook friend her mother knew nothing about.

Of course, Libby had her phone on her when she disappeared, but police believed it had since died or been turned off. It has never been publicly revealed what -if anything- was found on computers and other devices in her home.

It was roughly then that the first controversial decision of the night was made. According to Anna Williams, police decided “almost immediately” that there was no evidence the girls were planning on meeting anyone. Nor, supposedly, were they talking to anyone who was posting under a fake name or concealing their true identity. Without any new information to disseminate or an indication of imminent danger, authorities decided against issuing an Amber Alert.

Still, word continued to spread and worry continued to grow on social media. Missing children were so unusual in the small town that the mayor was notified and responded that very night, and a report about the missing girls aired on local news. A group of approximately 100 people – including Mike, Becky, Anna, other family, friends, and members of various law enforcement entities, including the Delphi Police Department, Delphi Volunteer Fire Department, and Carroll County Sheriff’s Department – converged on the area. People searched in the dark and cold for hours, with nothing more than their flashlights and concern to lead the way.

The mood had grown more somber throughout the night as the temperature steadily dropped and no sign of the girls could be found. Around 10 pm, the group began thinning out as people went home to rest with the understanding that they would return in the morning. Even so, shortly before midnight, the sheriff’s office issued a press release stating there was no reason to suspect foul play.

Then, a few minutes later, authorities made yet another controversial decision. The official search was called off until the next day.


If you have any information pertaining to their murders – or the social media profile “anthony_shots” – please call the Delphi Homicide Investigation Tip Line (844-459-5786), the Indiana State Police (1-800-382-7537), or the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department (765-564-2413). You can also contact Abbyandlibbytip@cacoshrf.com.

In Their Own Words: The Delphi Murders, Quote 2

“I was like there -there’s nothing wrong. There has to be nothing wrong. It’s just Grandma overreacting like always. Then, me and Cody crossed the bridge and we’re looking in the woods, and we couldn’t find them anywhere. That’s when I started to realize something was really wrong. I was yelling her name so that she could hear me, and I hope she did hear us searching.”

– Kelsi German, who was only 17 at the time she was participating in the search for her missing sister