ISP Need Help Identifying a Dead Child

A mushroom hunter stumbled across the dead body of a child yesterday, and the Indiana State Police is requesting the public’s help to identify him.

He is described as an African-American child between the ages of 5 and 8-years-old. The little boy has a thin build, a short haircut, and stood about four feet tall.

Found near a roadside in a wooded area just east of Washington County, police believe he died sometime within the last week. His cause of death is currently unknown. An autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday.

If you have information concerning this child, please contact Detective Matt Busick of the Indiana State Police in Sellersburg (1-812-248-4374 or 1-800-872-6743).

After Surviving Cancer, She Wanted a Happier Life. Her Husband Wanted Her Dead.

New details were recently released in the case against Andrew Wilhoite, the Lebanon resident accused of murdering his wife.

Cancer survivor Elizabeth Nicole “Nikki” Wilhoite, 41, first came to the attention of police on Friday, March 25th after she didn’t show up for work that morning. A concerned coworker at Indiana Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery contacted them, explaining that Nikki “was having issues with her husband” and had recently filed for divorce.

When Boone County Sheriff’s Deputy Craig Fouts went to the Wilhoite home to do a welfare check, he encountered the couple’s children. The kids told Deputy Fouts they had been unable to reach their mother and did not know where she was. Nikki’s stepdaughter suggested she might be at her sister’s because “Elizabeth leaves when she gets upset.”

As Fouts was preparing to leave, Nikki’s husband of 12 years pulled into the driveway on his tractor. Andrew Wilhoite told the deputy he last saw his wife the night before, around 11 pm. According to the probable cause affidavit later filed by the Boone County Prosecutor, “Andrew stated that they had a pretty good fight last night, and she was drunk.” He pointed out scratches on his neck, indicating they were evidence of Nikki’s aggression.

In this version of the story, Andrew said Nikki physically attacked him after learning about his affair. He claimed she went to sleep on the couch after their argument ended and, supposedly, was still asleep when he left that morning to work around the farm. He denied knowing why his wife wasn’t at work or where she might be. He did, however, volunteer the information that she had withdrawn $3000 from her retirement account the previous week and filed for divorce. Perhaps not coincidentally, Nikki’s petition for legal separation coincided with her last chemotherapy session.

If Andrew was trying to suggest that Nikki had simply left, a subsequent search of the property quickly cast doubt on that idea. Investigators found bloodstains on a mattress, set of sheets, and pillow. Blood was also found in the master bath. But the real damage to Andrew Wilhoite’s story occurred when Nikki’s cell phone, purse, and vehicle were discovered in the garage.

After collecting the evidence, the Boone County Sheriff’s Office declared Nikki an endangered missing person then recused itself from the case. Andrew Wilhoite’s mother is Marcia Wilhoite, a member of the Boone County Council. As councilwoman, she influences the budgets of other county officials, including the sheriff and prosecutor. Rather than risk a possible conflict of interest, Boone County Sheriff Mike Nielsen asked the Indiana State Police to assume lead on the case.

In the interview by state police, Andrew initially repeated his story, telling investigators Nikki typically consumed a large container of rum “every two days after work,” and it caused her to act belligerently. He insisted she “came at him,” during an argument about the affair she’d recently discovered. Investigators confronted him with pictures of the blood evidence from their bedroom, and Andrew said the blood was his. His confidence quickly wilted under continued questioning, though. He asked to speak to a lawyer.

After conferring with an attorney, Wilhoite told police he wished to make a statement and show them where to find Nikki’s body.

Andrew maintained that the couple had argued most of the night when Nikki (who, it should be noted, was physically weakened from both cancer and chemotherapy) attacked her much-larger husband and told him to leave. He responded by bodily throwing her out the front door. She allegedly turned to charge at him, and he struck her in the face with a gallon-sized concrete flowerpot, knocking her unconscious. He said he “didn’t know what to do” at that point, so he picked her up off the ground and threw her in his truck. Then he drove to Ross Ditch and dumped her over the bridge on Boone County 400 East, just south of County Road 350 North. According to the affidavit,“Andrew was asked if Elizabeth was still breathing, and Andrew stated he didn’t know because he didn’t check.”

Nikki’s body was found partially submerged in about 3 feet of water a few miles from her home. An autopsy later found she died of blunt force trauma.

The Boone County Prosecutor has filed murder charges against Andrew Wilhoite. He faces 45-60 years in prison if convicted.

If you or someone you love is the victim of domestic violence, please reach out for help at by calling the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-7233).

In Their Own Words: The Delphi Murders

“This intersection is tough for me. It will always be tough for me. I can close my eyes, and I can just see them. You know, I can see they came from the left side over here…and laughing and joking and cutting up like two young girls do, probably. And then they turn left and their world’s about to change.”

– ISP Superintendent Doug Carter, referring to the bridge trail

Deep Dive: The Delphi Murders, Part 1

The Monon High Bridge, the abandoned railroad trestle where Libby captured photos, video, and audio files on her phone just before she and Abby went missing.

It sounds like fiction.

Little is known about exactly what happened that day on the Monon High Bridge, but the few facts we do know are so incredible and disturbing that you could almost be forgiven for thinking this case couldn’t possibly be real. Sadly, the beginning is pure Grimm’s fairy tale: Two girls walking alone in the woods encounter a wolf in human’s clothing. The middle is more of a dystopian techno-thriller: Realizing they’re in trouble, one of the doomed heroines uses her phone to capture clues vital to solving her own murder.

But what happened that day to Libby and Abby is tragically real, and the end of their story hasn’t been written yet.

February 13, 2017: Friends Liberty “Libby” German (14) and Abigail “Abby” Williams (13) woke up late that morning after a sleepover at Libby’s house the previous night. Although the eighth graders would have normally been in school, all students in the Delphi Community School Corporation had that day off because both the previous Friday (February 10th) and Monday (February 13th) had been designated “Snow Make-Up Days” at the beginning of the academic year. However, since the winter had been mild and the allotted snow days hadn’t been used, the girls ended up with a four-day weekend instead.

And they were trying to make the most of it.

After spending Sunday practicing their softball swings, painting pictures in Libby’s room with Abby’s art supplies, and giggling late into the night, the girls were ready that next morning to start a new adventure. Libby, like many children, lived in a multigenerational household. Her home included her grandparents Mike and Becky Patty (who were also her legal guardians), father Derrick German, and older sister Kelsi. After Derrick made the girls breakfast, Libby asked her grandmother for permission to go to the Monon High Bridge Trail, a hiking spot just outside of Delphi’s city limits. Becky agreed but told the girls they would need to arrange a ride.

At first, it looked as if the girls would stuck at the house after all. Everyone in Libby’s busy family already had plans for the day. Then fate cruelly intervened.

When initially approached, Libby’s older sister Kelsi had refused the girls’ request, explaining that she was leaving to help her boyfriend clean a truck he hoped to sell before eventually heading to work. She already had a full day ahead of her and just didn’t have time to take the younger girls anywhere.

It was then, in a particularly heartbreaking twist, that Kelsi’s conscience got the better of her. The two sisters were close, and Kelsi felt guilty about letting Libby down. So she wound up relenting, telling her younger sibling that she could drop the girls off at the trails if they could arrange another ride home.

That decision must haunt Kelsi to this very day.

After securing the promise of a ride home from Libby’s dad, Derrick, the girls were on their way. Kelsi drove them to the Monon High Bridge, dropping them off near the trail’s entrance around 1:30 pm.

As she watched Libby and Abby walk away, talking between themselves, Kelsi had no way of knowing she would never see either girl alive again.


Please return for Part Two on Saturday. In the meantime, if you have any information pertaining to the murders of Libby German and Abby Williams- or the social media profile “anthony_shots” – please call the Delphi Homicide Investigation Tip Line (844-459-5786), the Indiana State Police (1-800-382-7537), or the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department (765-564-2413). You can also contact Abbyandlibbytip@cacoshrf.com.

Just The Facts: The Delphi Murders

Friends Libby German and Abby Williams were the victims of a double murder in 2017.

Date: Feb. 13, 2017

Place: The vicinity of the Monon High Bridge Trail, which is part of the Delphi Historic Trails

Perpetrators: (unknown)

Claim to Infamy: Taking advantage of a day off school, junior high school students  Liberty “Libby” German (14) and Abigail “Abby” Williams (13) were dropped off near the Monon High Bridge Trail by Libby’s older sister, Kelsi, at approximately 1:35 pm. About half an hour later, Libby posted a photo to her Snapchat of Abby walking the abandoned railroad trestle for which the trail is named. The girls were supposed to be picked up by Libby’s father around 3:15, less an hour after the Snapchat photo was posted, but they never showed. Increasingly nervous calls to their cellphones went unanswered.

After searching on their own without any success for a couple hours, the families reported the girls missing at 5:30 that evening. Crews comprised of local police, deputies, firefighters and the Department of Natural Resources canvassed the area until midnight. Authorities then halted their search for the night, announcing it was too dark to continue. Volunteers continued to comb the area long after the official search had ended.

Abby and Libby’s bodies were found the next day around noon. They were located on a wooded private property less than a mile from where they’d been dropped off the previous day. The causes of their deaths have never been released.

Random Disturbing Fact: Even though Libby somehow captured the man police believe to be the killer on her cellphone, they have yet to charge anyone with the murders.

Check back in a few days for a deeper dive on this case, including startling recent developments.

Anyone with information regarding this crime is encouraged to contact the Indiana State Police at (317) 232-8248 or call the Tip Line (765) 822-3535.