Man Accused of Exchanging Vapes for Sex with 14-yr-old

Jacob Scott Glenn, alleged predator

A Hamilton County man is accused of catfishing a 14-year-old girl he met on Snapchat and exchanging sex with her for vapes.

According to police, Cicero resident Jacob Scott Glenn, 24, posed as a 16-year-old girl when he established contact with the victim on Snapchat. Using the false identity, he lured the minor into an encounter under the pretense of selling her e-cigarettes. Then he took her to a second location and demanded sex for them instead.

Court documents state the minor left her house on Christmas by climbing out a window just after midnight. But rather than the female teen she expected to meet, the 14-year-old was surprised to see Glenn, an adult man. He convinced her to ride with him to a Pilot Travel Center in Daleville, across the Delaware County line. It was only then, after distancing the girl from her home, that the accused predator told her he didn’t want money. He wanted sex.

She complied, and they had at least one other similar encounter in January.

Unfortunately for Glenn, along with being an alleged predator, he’s also not too bright (allegedly). He later sent the victim a TikTok video of his truck, and she followed the link to his actual profile, where his age was listed as 24. Then she found him on another social media site and learned his real name.

Although the girl told friends and two separate teachers what had occurred, somehow it didn’t come to the attention of police until her father found the vape pens in her room. When asked how she acquired them, the 14-year-old confessed everything, prompting her father to contact local authorities. Photo and video evidence corroborating the girl’s story was taken from her phone by Chesterfield Police.

Glenn is currently being held in the Delaware County Jail without bond. He has been charged with promotion of human trafficking of a minor, a Level 3 felony; two counts of sexual misconduct with a minor, a Level 4 felony and two counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor, a misdemeanor.

He was also faces a previous charge for with sexual misconduct with a minor in October 2020. That case is still pending.

This Day in Infamy: The Meat Market Murder

1934 article from The Indianapolis Star

February 26, 1934 – The body of Lloyd C. Gleason (40) was found in the basement of his Yorktown meat market by his sister, Pearl Jefferson. The butcher had been shot three times – once in the forehead, once behind the left ear, and once in the back of the head – and had bruises consistent with a beating. Additionally, his lower left leg and shoe had been severely burned. “A long-barrel .22 caliber pistol” was found nearby.

The victim’s son, James “Marvin” Gleason (21), was taken into custody the next day. Marvin admitted to ownership of the gun but initially denied having anything to do with his father’s death, despite saying the older man had been an abusive alcoholic and adulterer who had caused the family hardship. Marvin’s story changed a few hours later, however, when police found his bloodstained clothing.

This time, Marvin claimed he’d been in an altercation with his father over a bottle of whiskey, and the fight had culminated in the shooting. He also admitted to trying to dispose of his father in the furnace, but he’d had to abandon that part of his plan when he couldn’t lift the corpse high enough to clear the furnace door.

After Marvin confessed, his mother told reporters her son had previously been to a psychiatric clinic in Detroit. Dora Gleason also claimed a physician there had recommended committing Marvin to a sanitarium to cure his dementia praecox, a generic term used for schizophrenia at the time, but the family lacked the funds to do so. The young man, who had been awarded but did not accept a Rector Scholarship at Depauw University, stayed instead at his grandparents’ home after graduation.

Within days of Dora’s statement to the press, Marvin gave another confession, this time implicating his mother as an accessory. He claimed that he and his mother had “reached an understanding” that he would kill his father, and she’d given him the idea of cremating the body in the furnace. On March 5th, one week to the day after the death of her husband, Dora was arrested . A grand jury later failed to indict her though, and charges against her were dismissed.

The following May, Judge L. A. Guthrie ruled Marvin Gleason “mentally incapable of standing trial” and confined him to the hospital for the criminally insane at the Indiana State Prison in Michigan City, where he would remain for almost six years. After his release, he changed his name and went to stay with his mother, who had remarried.