The Delphi Murders: A Copy of the Ronald Logan Search Warrant

Ronald Logan, pictured here during an interview with Inside Edition.

True crime fans were shocked yesterday when new details were revealed in the Delphi Murder case. The documents, obtained via a FOIA request by the Murder Street podcast, sadly confirmed some of the most lurid rumors surrounding the deaths of Libby German (14) and Abby Williams (13).

In a request for a warrant to search the property of Ronald Logan, an FBI agent noted that – although there had been no signs of a struggle -the girls lost a great deal of blood when they died. Their bodies were then “moved and staged” and pieces of their clothing taken. Investigators believe the killer may have taken other souveniers as well, such as photos or videos.

Ronald Logan’s house was less than 1500 feet from where the girls were found. Authorities received fifteen separate tips indicating he was responsible for the murders. His cousin stated in an interview that Logan had asked for help establishing a false alibi for the time of the murders, and GPS data indicated he was near the crime scene. A woman who had once been in a relationship with him said he was physically violent and “always” carried a gun in a fanny pack. A previous search of his property, executed in connection with a parole violation, noted he possessed multiple handguns and knives.

Ronald Logan died in 2020. He was never formally named a suspect in the case.


IMPD Officer Arrested for Battery Has Strange History

Officer Bad Luck Brian
Accused officer Michael Price

An officer of the Indianapolis Metro Police Department was arrested last week on suspicion of both battery and domestic battery. It wasn’t the first time his name has appeared in the local news.

The most recent incident occurred approximately 12:40 am last Saturday, April 30th, when IMPD officers went to the 8000 block of Gathering Lane after receiving an incomplete 911 text concerning a possible “active assault.” Upon arriving, the responding officers learned one of the parties involved in the assault was Michael Price, a 13-year-veteran of the IMPD. The matter was then referred to the Special Investigation Unit (SIU). Officer Price was arrested shortly thereafter and booked into the Marion County Jail.

In April of 2017, Officer Price was briefly the subject of another investigation when the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department responded to a shooting. According to the sheriff, the off-duty IMPD officer was seated in his patrol car in front of his New Palestine home when he accidentally shot himself in the leg. He reportedly told sheriffs on the scene that he had taken his personal firearm – a .40-caliber mini Glock – from its holster and was attempting to clear the chamber when it fired. It does not appear Price faced any disciplinary action in regard to the accidental discharge of his weapon.

Officer Price was in the media again last year when a fire broke out in his Fountaintown home. A charitable fund was set up through the Professional Police Officers Credit Union to help his family at that time.

As of today’s date, the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office has not filed any charges against him in connection with last week’s arrest. He has been placed on administrative leave pending criminal and internal investigations.

Deep Dive: The Delphi Murders, Part 2

Libby German and Abby Williams, two friends whose lives were sadistically cut short in 2017.

In 2017, the Monon High Bridge Trail was much more inconspicuous than it is today. Mention the bridge or its namesake pedestrian trail to anyone now – especially anyone in Indiana – and the terrible murders of two young girls immediately leap to mind. But before someone lured Abby Williams and Libby German there to their deaths, making the area infamous, it was one of the state’s many hidden gems, appreciated by the local cognoscenti while simultaneously unknown to the outside world.

Built in the 1890s as a part of the Monon Rail Line spanning Deer Creek, the trestle bridge technically belonged to CSX Transportation at the time. However, in all practicality, it’d stood abandoned since the 1980s. The intervening years had seen the decaying bridge fall into disrepair and become dangerous to cross. By 2017, High Bridge had been pretty much forgotten by everyone except the surrounding community, for whom it remained both a source of worry and a popular hiking attraction. Posting pictures from atop the crumbling, 60-ft-tall bridge had become a social media rite of passage for the more-adventurous local teens and photographers.

Both Libby and Abby were into photography, and it seemed only natural they would be interested in joining the many other liberated students roaming the trails that day. Besides, there was safety in numbers and the girls were together, so it would’ve been perfectly understandable if no one had realized anything was wrong when the duo failed to turn up for the ride home. However, one of the most painful details about this entire case is just how quickly people did realize something had gone very, very wrong with Abby and Libby, yet still couldn’t save them.

When he’d initially agreed to be the girls’ return driver, Derrick had explained that he needed to finish his current task first and wouldn’t be available until sometime between 3 and 3:30. He’d arranged to shoot Libby a text when he was on his way though, so the girls would know when to return to the trailhead. True to his word, phone records indicate Derrick started texting at 3:11. When he didn’t receive a reply, he tried calling but received no answer. It wasn’t like his daughter to just ignore him, and Derrick began to worry, thinking perhaps the girls were hurt or lost. He parked his car and almost immediately started walking the trails in an attempt to find them.

Around five minutes later, Derrick encountered “an older man” coming from the 501 trail. Little information has been publicly released about this person, other than he was wearing a flannel shirt that day and has since been interviewed extensively by police. Derrick reportedly asked the older man in the flannel shirt if he’d seen the girls down on the trail; the man denied it but said that there were “a couple” under the bridge. Because this older man indicated the girls weren’t on the 501, Derrick headed down the trail known as the 505. There was still no sign of either Abby or Libby.

At that point, the concerned father began enlisting the help of other family members. He called his mother Becky, who conferred with her own sister, Tara. Both women tried unsuccessfully to reach Libby for more than half an hour before Tara left to join Derrick in his search. Meanwhile, Becky was faced with the unfortunate task of telling her husband, Mike, and Libby’s sister Kelsi that the girls couldn’t be found.

The family continued searching the woods for the girls on their own before calling police at 5:20 pm.

By then, the girls had been missing for just over two hours.


My apologies for the lateness of this entry. The entire purpose of this site is to help inform people of these crimes, and even one wrong word could result in the spread of misinformation. In the attempt to triple-check all known facts, posts sometimes take longer than anticipated. However, I feel I owe it to the victims and their families to be thorough. Please join me tomorrow for the next installment in this series.

Deep Dive: The Delphi Murders, Part 1

The Monon High Bridge, the abandoned railroad trestle where Libby captured photos, video, and audio files on her phone just before she and Abby went missing.

It sounds like fiction.

Little is known about exactly what happened that day on the Monon High Bridge, but the few facts we do know are so incredible and disturbing that you could almost be forgiven for thinking this case couldn’t possibly be real. Sadly, the beginning is pure Grimm’s fairy tale: Two girls walking alone in the woods encounter a wolf in human’s clothing. The middle is more of a dystopian techno-thriller: Realizing they’re in trouble, one of the doomed heroines uses her phone to capture clues vital to solving her own murder.

But what happened that day to Libby and Abby is tragically real, and the end of their story hasn’t been written yet.

February 13, 2017: Friends Liberty “Libby” German (14) and Abigail “Abby” Williams (13) woke up late that morning after a sleepover at Libby’s house the previous night. Although the eighth graders would have normally been in school, all students in the Delphi Community School Corporation had that day off because both the previous Friday (February 10th) and Monday (February 13th) had been designated “Snow Make-Up Days” at the beginning of the academic year. However, since the winter had been mild and the allotted snow days hadn’t been used, the girls ended up with a four-day weekend instead.

And they were trying to make the most of it.

After spending Sunday practicing their softball swings, painting pictures in Libby’s room with Abby’s art supplies, and giggling late into the night, the girls were ready that next morning to start a new adventure. Libby, like many children, lived in a multigenerational household. Her home included her grandparents Mike and Becky Patty (who were also her legal guardians), father Derrick German, and older sister Kelsi. After Derrick made the girls breakfast, Libby asked her grandmother for permission to go to the Monon High Bridge Trail, a hiking spot just outside of Delphi’s city limits. Becky agreed but told the girls they would need to arrange a ride.

At first, it looked as if the girls would stuck at the house after all. Everyone in Libby’s busy family already had plans for the day. Then fate cruelly intervened.

When initially approached, Libby’s older sister Kelsi had refused the girls’ request, explaining that she was leaving to help her boyfriend clean a truck he hoped to sell before eventually heading to work. She already had a full day ahead of her and just didn’t have time to take the younger girls anywhere.

It was then, in a particularly heartbreaking twist, that Kelsi’s conscience got the better of her. The two sisters were close, and Kelsi felt guilty about letting Libby down. So she wound up relenting, telling her younger sibling that she could drop the girls off at the trails if they could arrange another ride home.

That decision must haunt Kelsi to this very day.

After securing the promise of a ride home from Libby’s dad, Derrick, the girls were on their way. Kelsi drove them to the Monon High Bridge, dropping them off near the trail’s entrance around 1:30 pm.

As she watched Libby and Abby walk away, talking between themselves, Kelsi had no way of knowing she would never see either girl alive again.


Please return for Part Two on Saturday. In the meantime, if you have any information pertaining to the murders of Libby German and Abby Williams- or the social media profile “anthony_shots” – please call the Delphi Homicide Investigation Tip Line (844-459-5786), the Indiana State Police (1-800-382-7537), or the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department (765-564-2413). You can also contact Abbyandlibbytip@cacoshrf.com.

Just The Facts: The Delphi Murders

Friends Libby German and Abby Williams were the victims of a double murder in 2017.

Date: Feb. 13, 2017

Place: The vicinity of the Monon High Bridge Trail, which is part of the Delphi Historic Trails

Perpetrators: (unknown)

Claim to Infamy: Taking advantage of a day off school, junior high school students  Liberty “Libby” German (14) and Abigail “Abby” Williams (13) were dropped off near the Monon High Bridge Trail by Libby’s older sister, Kelsi, at approximately 1:35 pm. About half an hour later, Libby posted a photo to her Snapchat of Abby walking the abandoned railroad trestle for which the trail is named. The girls were supposed to be picked up by Libby’s father around 3:15, less an hour after the Snapchat photo was posted, but they never showed. Increasingly nervous calls to their cellphones went unanswered.

After searching on their own without any success for a couple hours, the families reported the girls missing at 5:30 that evening. Crews comprised of local police, deputies, firefighters and the Department of Natural Resources canvassed the area until midnight. Authorities then halted their search for the night, announcing it was too dark to continue. Volunteers continued to comb the area long after the official search had ended.

Abby and Libby’s bodies were found the next day around noon. They were located on a wooded private property less than a mile from where they’d been dropped off the previous day. The causes of their deaths have never been released.

Random Disturbing Fact: Even though Libby somehow captured the man police believe to be the killer on her cellphone, they have yet to charge anyone with the murders.

Check back in a few days for a deeper dive on this case, including startling recent developments.

Anyone with information regarding this crime is encouraged to contact the Indiana State Police at (317) 232-8248 or call the Tip Line (765) 822-3535.